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Brain-Body Tactical Training for Military and First Responders

Warfighters, police, and firefighters must perform a diversity of tasks in high-stress environments.  Optimal execution requires ongoing coordination of physical and cognitive resources to meet the common and unique demands presented by both task and setting.

SMARTfit’s gamified technology trains the brain and body simultaneously to maximize cognitive and physical performance under physical and mental stress. Also known as dual tasking, this approach has been scientifically proven faster and more effective at activating neuroplasticity in the brain to improve performance than training the brain or body separately.

SMARTfit uniquely tests, trains, scales, and measures performance across a comprehensive range of cognitive demands while concurrently executing a variety of multi-planar physical movements and skills. 

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SMARTfit Specifically Measures and Trains the Unique Challenges of Tactical Operations

  • Cognitive and physical speed
  • Tolerating distractions – visual, cognitive, manual, auditory
  • Tolerating high pressure conditions with consequences
  • High demands on capacity and accuracy in working AND long-term memory
  • Task interruption, prioritization, switching, resuming
  • Integration of semantic (facts), episodic (prior events) and automatized procedural memory (“motor memory” skills/habits)
  • Physical and cognitive demands to the point of exhaustion
  • Inhibition of self-centric behaviors that are counter to mission fulfillment

SMARTfit trains the brain to put “Movement in the Background”, resulting in greater automaticity so the tactical warfighter or first responder can focus more on the tasks at hand.

The Science Behind Dual Tasking

(One of many studies demonstrating the benefits of dual-task training)
Decreased activation shows that Dual Tasking intervention led to more efficient brain activity in the pre-frontal cortex as measured by fMRI – Shu Nishiguchi PT, MSc et al. 2015.